About My Work

Monet's Angels (Red Door Publishing 2015)
MONET'S ANGELS is a story of passion and intrigue, of two women drawn together by destiny. It is set in the last golden days before the First World War when a beautiful house and garden inspired some of the worlds greatest paintings. In the Normandy town of Giverny two women meet. Their backgrounds are worlds apart: Blanche, provincial French and middle aged, Judith a young, beautiful, rich heiress. Their common ground lies in Claude Monet, the impressionist painter, but their motives are very different. It is 1913 and the elderly Monet is fighting his failing eyesight to create his Water Lily panels, which will be his swan song. Blanche, his dutiful stepdaughter, has renounced her considerable painting talent to support him. Into this orderly household, Judith arrives like a shooting star, fascinating everyone she encounters. She is determined to flout her parents wishes for a strategic marriage and live her bohemian dream.

The Great Sicilian Cat Rescue: One English Woman's Mission to Save an Island's Cats
(John Blake Publishing 2015)
Numerous visitors to Mediterranean countries have found their holiday punctuated by trips to feed hungry feral cats. Some try to save injured and sick felines. Not many have gone to the lengths of Jenny Pulling with her one-woman campaign, Catsnip. Set against the beautiful and sinister backdrop of Sicily and its enigmatic people, the book charts Jenny's journey as passionate defender of the island's often abused and ill-treated cats.

Feasting and Fasting (HarperCollins Fontana 1985)
I wish I could stop eating is the cry of every compulsive eater. The obsessive pattern of feasting and fasting is well known to the author who suffered from anorexia in the past. In a very personal and readable way she analyses the lives of many compulsive esters. These case histories show that stress, guilt, lack of control, unhappiness, feelings of inferiority or psychological imbalances can spark off food craving, gorging or starvation. Jennifer Pulling shows that the sufferer is not alone. She pinpoints the dangers and symptoms to look out for suggesting positive changes in life style and nutrition designed to help the sufferer of an eating disorder conquer this. It can be done. The book offers hope based on the author’s own experience.

The Caring Trap (HarperCollins Fontana 1987)
There is an army of people in this country with elderly or disabled dependants fighting a valiant battle against isolation, frustration–even acute depression. And as longevity increases, more and more people will fall into the caring trap. But need it be a trap? Jennifer Pulling has interviewed dozens of carers and includes her experience of looking after her ailing mother for many years. In telling their stories she points out the pitfalls – emotional, financial and physical – of the caring role and provides practical advice on how to cope with them. More than anything else, carers need support and the vital knowledge that they are not alone. This sympathetic book provides it.

Primrose (Congress Theatre 2009)
What kind of woman hands round sweets at her husband's trial for multiple murders? Did Primrose Shipman deny to herself that her beloved Fred was capable of killing on a spectacular scale? In ‘Primrose’ Jennifer Pulling dissects the relationship of this odd couple As their life together is unraveled and the ties that bind revealed, one tantalising question remains unanswered: if she knows more than she admits, what monstrous kind of loyalty is it that protects a mass murderer? The playwright shows us that nothing, not even life and death, can be wholly defined, even monsters are vulnerable. Says Jennifer: ‘The motive for murder is always intriguing and never more so than in the case of the Doctor of Death. In the play I present what I believe lay behind this man’s mission to kill. But it is the psyche of the person who supports a partner’s dark deeds which really interests me.’

Homecoming
As a journalist, I visited the Marais area in Paris, a few years ago. I was impressed by the area and the strong sense of something having happened there. Over the week that I was there I explored the narrow streets, had dinner at Jo Goldberg the famous Jewish restaurant and discovered the history of this Jewish quarter. On 16/17 July 1942 a Nazi decreed mass arrest in Paris was carried out by the police. Victims were arrested, held then shipped by rail to Auschwitz for extermination. French policemen and civil servants played a complicit role. It seems that some, particularly children were rescued by holy sisters before the raid and found a hiding place in another part of Paris. This is the case with my two characters, Emile and Jeanne Goldstein, a young Jewish brother and sister. Later still, after the war, members of the French population took over the empty houses and apartments. I was lucky enough to talk to people who remembered that time and later bought a book Rue de Rosier that gives a vivid picture of the life of this area both before, during, and after WW2. HOMECOMING is the result.

Meat (Television Script)
In the early 1990s the export of live animals commenced from Shoreham Port. Angered by the sight of young calves being sent to the veal sheds of Europe, local people joined together in mass and dally demonstrations. This is the background of MEAT. Mark, a jobless and disillusioned Oxbridge graduate angry at the system, joins a rent a crowd from London. When he meets Stella, a middle aged animal activist he is persuaded to become a true demonstrator. 
When a television journalist interviews Mark he becomes infatuated with her and believes his feelings are returned. He is to be disillusioned as she is using him. At a service for animals Mark’s conversation with the priest sets him on a new path. Terminally ill, Stella is finally admitted to hospital where she knows she will die. Mark promises her to fight on and finally the exports are stopped.