Writer's Blog

Beating Writer's Block Tip 7

I am hoping by now some of you have defeated the dreaded writer's block and are happily scribbling away. But if the muse continues to elude you, here is my tip 7. Now this is going to sound a trifle weird but I'm told, on good authority, it works! It's called the Glass of Water technique. Before you go to bed, fill a glass with water. Hold it up and speak to it, yes, speak to it. Voice your intention. You might say: I intend to write fluently and crestively tomorrow, or I choose to discover a way forward for my characters' stories, or as I sleep and dream, any prpblems with moving my plot forward will be resolved.Drink half the water and stand the glass by your bed. When you wake, drink the other half then go straight to your computer and write for at least an hour. Do this for three nights. Give it a try, it works.

Beating Writer's Block

If you are experiencing writer's block I am here to help. Today's hunt is movement. Dance, stretch, garde, go for a walk. All these acitivities relax mind and body and this is a state thst encourages creativity!

What you've Been Waiting For!

At last, you will know what happened to Judith Goldstein after her tragic accident and return to America. In MONET'S SHADOW the sequel to my novel MONET'S ANGELS we meet an older and possibly wiser Judith hell bent on preventing history repeating itself. Out soon.

THE RIGHT CHOICE

There is a saying: 'all cats are grey at night'  when it comes to the many breeds of feline this is certaily not the case. From the sedate Persian to the energetic Abyssinian there is a world of difference not only in their colour and size but their temperament. It makes sense, therefore if you are considering a cat that isn't a moggy to choose a breed that is in tune with your temperament.  There is no use in going for a mischievous Siamese if you're not prepared to offer lot of diversions to keep her occupied. Likewise if you're looking for a feline who will snuggle on your lap in front of the television don't opt for a Norweigian Forest cat who loves to roam outdoors. If you're looking for some guidance my book THE CAT PAPERSCAPES provides all the information you need to make the right choice.

Another time, another place

Let me take you on a journey into the past, to 1937 when a young woman found love in the romantic setting of Calude Monet's France.  Immerse yourself in the beauty of his flower garden. Live with Isabelle the joy and pain of a first love.  

Read more: Another time, another place

The Cat

This sumptuous book celebrates the sheer variety of cats around the world, with beautiful photography accompanied by a lyrical and expertly-written text that describes the key characteristics of over 50 species. It also features paper press-outs, enabling you to view the cats in relief and create the most spectacular book art. Press out the cats, fan out the pages, and display your copy as a work of art on a shelf or mantelpiece.

Order from Amazon now

Dear writer: please don't TELL us, SHOW us

I am sometimes asked to read other writers' work and to offer a critique. Generally, their storyline moves along. BUT while these authors probably have a clear idea in their heads of the appearance of their characters, their surroundings and the locations in which they move, we are not mind readers. We may be told that a character is 'beautiful' another is 'amusing' or that a room is 'badly decorated', a birth is 'long and difficult' or, again, that the countryside is 'unfriendly' THIS IS JUST NOT ENOUGH. We need pictures painted for us, specific details, tellingactions or dialogue that reveals every character as an individual. Otherwise the story remains on a two dimensional level and worst of all, does not hook the reader. Showing rather than telling demands much more work so that we 'see' the characters, the locations, understand them by the way they behave. The reward will be that your reader 'feels they are there.'

WRITERS ARE POACHERS

I'm sure you've had the advice: 'write about what you know' and sometimes thought that can be quite limiting. But if you widen your horizons you'll realise that you 'know' a great deal more than you imagined. Writers like D.H. Lawrece poached without any guilt on the experiences and stories other people told him. The French writer Colette's characters were often based on people she knew. so cleverly did she do it that they never realised she was writing about THEM.So, keep a notebook and jot down snippets and stories people tell you. You don;t have to copy them slavishly but they will expand your range of 'what you know.'

Creating characters that 'live'

If I asked you which is your favourite book it is likely you'll name one where its characters have stayed long in your mind after you came to the last page. Emma in Emma Bovary, Mrs Ramsey in To the Lighthouse are just two women with whom I've shared their lives.

As a writer intent on creating strong characters  you need to know them through and through if they are going to come alive on the page.Spend some time living with them, in your imagination, 'talk' to them, preferably not in public or you might get some funny looks.

If brain storming is your thing, sit yourself down with pen and paper and sketch them out as fully as you can. This way you will know how they think, feel and act which will influence how you write about them.

 

 

Writing dialogue: a technique

There are certain rules about formatting dialogue that beginners sometimes neglect. One. It should be separated from the narrative passages. Fresh line, indent, open quotes. These are usually single in British text and double in American. Two. New line, new indent when another person is speaking. Three. a certain amount of narrative can be included, for example: 'She picked up the book and opened it at page ten,'this is what I was referring to.' Apart from allowing the reader to follow a conversation with ease, it also 'breaks up' a page of text.

Ear Wigging

Are you like me and can't resist ear wigging on other people's conversations. You know the scene: you are sipping a flat white in a cafe or riding on the top deck of a bus and you hear the most astounding or funny remarks:. 'so, I'm going to dye my hair bright green'  'you'd never believe what he keeps in that toolshed of his'

As a writer, this could set the imagination working and might spark the idea of a story.I wrote a play called THE WOMAN WHO WASHED HER KNICKERS after hearing a bizarre remark about 'flying sperm'.

My advice is to carry a notebook wherever you go and jot down these gems. You think you'll remember them, but you won't. Over time you'll collect a wealth of material that will often come in useful when you are think of what to write. 

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I am based in Shoreham-by-Sea
West Sussex

Email: info@jenniferpulling.co.uk

 

Writers Workshops

Unleash your imagination at one of my forthcoming workshops, beginners welcome, I take an organic approach which encourages the writer to sift through experience and allow it to compost in the imagination.... read more